Chris Galusha

Senior Project Manager

Texas EcoBuilders

Nearly three decades in residential design, construction and land development, currently working with nonprofits.

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6 minutes (SixFree Call) $0 (No charge)
15 minutes $15.00
30 minutes $25.00
60 minutes $45.00

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Tiny Home Guru Texas EcoBuilders

Biography

Chris Galusha is a construction consultant and advocate for safe, affordable housing. Since 2010, he has focused on the tiny house industry and works to teach and mentor those interested in construction, regenerative agriculture, and land development. He is currently director of construction for a veterans organization, developing tiny home plans and construction training programs in the Dallas, Texas area.

Experience

Landscape Designer / Project Manager

Eat the Yard
November 2016 - present

President

American Tiny House Association, Inc.
October 2016 - present

Managing Member

Blackland Prairie Farm, LLC.
2015 - June 2017

Lead General Manager

RDStokes, LLC.
August 2016 - August 2017

Education

Texas A&M- Commerce

Bachelor's Degree

B.S. Plant & Soil Science, Minor in Environmental Science

-Research in Soil as a Building Medium

-Special Project: Personal Aquifier Construction

Other

10/14/2017 2:16:10 PM,
Chris Galusha replied:

I find that tiny house festivals are very useful, there is so much to learn at a tiny house festival and what you focus will be your choice.

I usually go to tiny house festivals to:

  • look for new ideas and to
  • talk to manufacturers about the new and existing products
  • tour the homes on display and look for innovative and creative ways to solve problems, for instance what new places or ways have people come up with for making storage available in tiny homes.
  • look for design and layout ideas. I examine the use of different types of finishes on the exterior and interior of homes. The construction of the different built in furniture pieces and the artistic expression of the designer and builders.

Being a builder and an advocate for making tiny homes a legal option in as many places as possible I also look for stuff that would violate local, county and state building codes. I then figure out how I would do it differently or if it is something that could be updated in the codes without compromising the safety of the homes occupants or their neighbors.

Finally, as a speakerand advocate I look at it as a chance to make new acquaintances and friends, talk about ideas and hatch plans to work on making tiny homes available to everyone as a housing option anywhere in the US.

 

7/5/2017 12:40:10 PM,
Chris Galusha replied:
Appliances:
I recommend that appliances be sized for average usage. What I mean by this is if your do not normally use four burners at once for cooking then don't try and squeeze a full sized range into your tiny house. Most people usually use a single burner at a time and ocassionally two. I think more than two in use at any one time is a rarity for most people so I recommend a two burner cooktop at most or better a set of moveable induction hot plates. They cool off quickly and they can be stored out of the way when not in use.
Instead of an oven I recommend getting one of the larger toaster ovens or better yet a convection microwave oven. It can be more expensive than a cheap conventional oven, it takes up less space and can be stored when not in use.

On electronics consider installing a small HDMI projecter, pull down or fold down screen and a sound bar rather than installing a TV on the wall. You can then use that wall space for art, storage or something else.

Multiple-use furniture.

Most Furniture for tiny homes is custom built to fit the space and functions that it needs to accomplish. However, I recently bought some modular furniture that I am quite pleased with from HomeReserve.com It is modular so I was able to buid the sectional to fit my space, it comes ready to assemle (we built seven sections in about 3 hours), all the pieces come with a ten year warranty, and each piece has built in storage. If you want to change the fabric or add on at a later date everything is sold as individual pieces including the fabric coverings.

No matter what the category of item, space is at a premium in a tiny home, select the smallest and most energy efficient device for the task you are performing.

I hope this helps.

Chris Galusha
TexasEcoBuilders.com